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Thread: OT: what do I say?

  1. #21
    Micah Klesick
    Guest

    Default Re: what do I say?

    Linda Gerfen wrote:

    > I've been hearing quite a bit about this bee problem on Coast to Coast AM
    > (radio show) in recent weeks. Strange that no bee bodies are being found.
    > Funny thing is that last summer (2006) I saw honey bees in my backyard for
    > the first time in the 11 years that I've lived in my home here in Nevada.
    > Prior to that it was only smaller insects that look like a small bee and
    > wasps, which are both still around.
    >
    > BTW, I am in full view of a dairy farm complete with cows of all cow colors.
    > <grin>
    >
    > Linda
    >
    >

    That is the whole problem, since they go out of the hive and die, we
    have a really hard time finding out what killed them.

    At least you know that chocolate milk does not come from brown cows. <g>
    Micah

  2. #22
    Garret Mott
    Guest

    Default Re: what do I say?

    > At least you know that chocolate milk does not come from brown cows. <g>

    Everyone who drinks Quik knows that it comes from rabbits....<vbg>

    Happy Easter all!

    Garret Mott

    Auto-Mate Software www.automatesoftware.com
    Northeast DataFlex Consortium www.nedataflex.com



  3. #23
    Waterspider
    Guest

    Default Waterspider Web Design Tips


    "Micah Klesick" <Micah@creationtidbits.com> wrote
    > Meanwhile, what do you guys think of the design?
    > Micah
    >

    Well, you asked.

    Background - Use a solid-colour background, i.e. pale yellow or even white.
    The one you've got ends before the right edge of my screen and disappears
    before the bottom of some of the pages. I know it's a honeycomb, but it
    looks like some kind of plastic filter or screen.

    Colour - No, I didn't spell it wrong, I'm Canadian. <g>
    A contrasting colour, used sparingly, might be attractive. You could try
    blue or green, but not red or orange. You need something to get away from
    that jaundiced glow you've got going on now with all the different shades of
    yellow.

    Graphic Elements - The banner and nav bar do not do their job of framing the
    content of the page, rather they get lost amongst the confusion of all the
    other stuff. Perhaps choose larger banner and menu button images, and
    definitely don't put anything above them. Things seem to be placed
    helter-skelter. Lose the boxes, let the text appear on the background. Right
    now the text is running right up to the edge of the boxes, making the page
    look crowded and way too busy.

    Photos - Delete or at least change the mouseover text on Ginger's photo
    ("Early Property 022"). Yeah, a couple of the others are weird too. Keep
    your photos consistent, i.e. don't have one with rounded corners and others
    square, some with borders and some without. "Ray Tammy Dan" is a nice photo,
    but who are these people, what do they have to do with beekeeping and why is
    their photo on the website? The viewer should not be asking himself these
    questions. Finally, if I was thinking honey, I wouldn't want to see a photo
    of an aging, long-haired dog but I don't think you want to mention this to
    your clients. Macro photos of bees on flowers would be great though.

    Content - Proofread again. You've got a couple of typos and there shouldn't
    be any on such a small site that you've been paid for. Why is Agribusiness
    Management Company capitalized? I think the site would be more effective
    with more information on honeybees.

    General Layout - There doesn't seem to be any rhyme nor reason to how you've
    placed things on pages. Draw (on paper) an outline of the visual components
    of the page, and remember that the viewer's eye will travel from the upper
    left corner to the lower right. So, you want the most "weight" along the
    left margin to keep his eye (his attention) from zooming right off the page.
    A stronger nav bar would accomplish this, then you could place your credit
    card logos and your own copyright notice underneath.

    To get you in the mood, here's a cool page I found while looking at other
    beekeeper websites:
    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/alien...media/bee.html

    Finally, I think you've got a good handle on NOF; everything seems to work
    well, but I think you have to do just a bit of studying up on design
    principles and writing for the web if you're going to be turning this into a
    business. Good luck, and please don't take any of this blather personally.
    It's merely my opinion, and you did ask for it. <g>



  4. #24
    Linda Gerfen
    Guest

    Default Re: Waterspider Web Design Tips


    "Waterspider" <nospam@all.com> wrote in message
    news:ev9up7$nl3@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com...
    >
    > General Layout - There doesn't seem to be any rhyme nor reason to how
    > you've placed things on pages. Draw (on paper) an outline of the visual
    > components of the page, and remember that the viewer's eye will travel
    > from the upper left corner to the lower right. So, you want the most
    > "weight" along the left margin to keep his eye (his attention) from
    > zooming right off the page. A stronger nav bar would accomplish this, then
    > you could place your credit card logos and your own copyright notice
    > underneath.
    >


    With regards to layout, this study is quite interesting and helpful:
    http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/main.htm

    Linda



  5. #25
    Richard Wayne Garganta
    Guest

    Default Re: Waterspider Web Design Tips

    Very interesting but here is the way I see it. If everyone designs
    websites following certain guidelines, then all sites start to look the
    same. Sameness breeds mediocrity and boredom. Then the site that gets
    the most focus will be the one that is different. I feel, we as web
    designers are getting stuck real bad with this square, centered look,
    with left and bottom navigation.
    I break the "rules" deliberately and watch as people say, "Hey, that is
    different." It gets attention immediately. Web design is ART. And
    there is some truth to the statement that you can't learn ART. You can
    learn to copy art, but that ain't the same. I have seen websites
    designed by experts that carefully choose everything from "color wheel"
    matched colors to pixel widths of lines and some kid will get on and
    throw something together with no knowledge at all and everyone goes,
    "Wow, look at that!"
    Sometimes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.

    Linda Gerfen wrote:
    > "Waterspider" <nospam@all.com> wrote in message
    > news:ev9up7$nl3@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com...
    >> General Layout - There doesn't seem to be any rhyme nor reason to how
    >> you've placed things on pages. Draw (on paper) an outline of the visual
    >> components of the page, and remember that the viewer's eye will travel
    >> from the upper left corner to the lower right. So, you want the most
    >> "weight" along the left margin to keep his eye (his attention) from
    >> zooming right off the page. A stronger nav bar would accomplish this, then
    >> you could place your credit card logos and your own copyright notice
    >> underneath.
    >>

    >
    > With regards to layout, this study is quite interesting and helpful:
    > http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/main.htm
    >
    > Linda
    >
    >


  6. #26
    Micah Klesick
    Guest

    Default Re: Waterspider Web Design Tips

    Richard Wayne Garganta wrote:
    > Very interesting but here is the way I see it. If everyone designs
    > websites following certain guidelines, then all sites start to look the
    > same. Sameness breeds mediocrity and boredom. Then the site that gets
    > the most focus will be the one that is different. I feel, we as web
    > designers are getting stuck real bad with this square, centered look,
    > with left and bottom navigation.
    > I break the "rules" deliberately and watch as people say, "Hey, that is
    > different." It gets attention immediately. Web design is ART. And
    > there is some truth to the statement that you can't learn ART. You can
    > learn to copy art, but that ain't the same. I have seen websites
    > designed by experts that carefully choose everything from "color wheel"
    > matched colors to pixel widths of lines and some kid will get on and
    > throw something together with no knowledge at all and everyone goes,
    > "Wow, look at that!"
    > Sometimes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
    >


    I have to agree with you that all the websites look the same. <g>

  7. #27
    Micah Klesick
    Guest

    Default Re: Waterspider Web Design Tips

    Waterspider wrote:
    > "Micah Klesick" <Micah@creationtidbits.com> wrote
    >> Meanwhile, what do you guys think of the design?
    >> Micah
    >>

    > Well, you asked.
    >
    > Background - Use a solid-colour background, i.e. pale yellow or even white.
    > The one you've got ends before the right edge of my screen and disappears
    > before the bottom of some of the pages. I know it's a honeycomb, but it
    > looks like some kind of plastic filter or screen.
    >
    > Colour - No, I didn't spell it wrong, I'm Canadian. <g>
    > A contrasting colour, used sparingly, might be attractive. You could try
    > blue or green, but not red or orange. You need something to get away from
    > that jaundiced glow you've got going on now with all the different shades of
    > yellow.
    >
    > Graphic Elements - The banner and nav bar do not do their job of framing the
    > content of the page, rather they get lost amongst the confusion of all the
    > other stuff. Perhaps choose larger banner and menu button images, and
    > definitely don't put anything above them. Things seem to be placed
    > helter-skelter. Lose the boxes, let the text appear on the background. Right
    > now the text is running right up to the edge of the boxes, making the page
    > look crowded and way too busy.
    >
    > Photos - Delete or at least change the mouseover text on Ginger's photo
    > ("Early Property 022"). Yeah, a couple of the others are weird too. Keep
    > your photos consistent, i.e. don't have one with rounded corners and others
    > square, some with borders and some without. "Ray Tammy Dan" is a nice photo,
    > but who are these people, what do they have to do with beekeeping and why is
    > their photo on the website? The viewer should not be asking himself these
    > questions. Finally, if I was thinking honey, I wouldn't want to see a photo
    > of an aging, long-haired dog but I don't think you want to mention this to
    > your clients. Macro photos of bees on flowers would be great though.
    >
    > Content - Proofread again. You've got a couple of typos and there shouldn't
    > be any on such a small site that you've been paid for. Why is Agribusiness
    > Management Company capitalized? I think the site would be more effective
    > with more information on honeybees.
    >
    > General Layout - There doesn't seem to be any rhyme nor reason to how you've
    > placed things on pages. Draw (on paper) an outline of the visual components
    > of the page, and remember that the viewer's eye will travel from the upper
    > left corner to the lower right. So, you want the most "weight" along the
    > left margin to keep his eye (his attention) from zooming right off the page.
    > A stronger nav bar would accomplish this, then you could place your credit
    > card logos and your own copyright notice underneath.
    >
    > To get you in the mood, here's a cool page I found while looking at other
    > beekeeper websites:
    > http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/alien...media/bee.html
    >
    > Finally, I think you've got a good handle on NOF; everything seems to work
    > well, but I think you have to do just a bit of studying up on design
    > principles and writing for the web if you're going to be turning this into a
    > business. Good luck, and please don't take any of this blather personally.
    > It's merely my opinion, and you did ask for it. <g>
    >
    >


    thanks for the thoughts and ideas. Fact is, I have tried about 75% of
    everything you said. The website is set up exactly like they wanted it.
    A little annoying to me at times, but I try and suggest, then I do
    what they want. <g>
    I totally agree on the dog, but he insisted on it.
    If you had read the text on the supplier page you would know who Tammy,
    Ray and Dan are. <g>
    I will check out the text again.
    The thing about this site is that it is not ABOUT beekeeping, it is
    about beekeeping supplies, so he does not think that it need much info
    on beekeeping itself.
    On the layout, I have put pics where he wanted them and how. <g> I
    tried to place them in certain spots, etc. but he had too many and knew
    where he wanted them. <g>
    I found that PBS website a long time ago, never did watch all of it
    though, as it not very good for learning anything. A lot of it is not
    so good info. Cool layout though.
    On the good handle with NOF you are right. <g>
    I have a tutorial website on NOF that I started about 1-2 months ago.
    http://www.learnNOF.creationtidbits.com

    I will be putting some of your thoughts in, at least the ones they
    like.
    Thanks,
    Micah



  8. #28
    Mike C
    Guest

    Default Re: what do I say?

    Micah I noticed you have been involved in checking out the guest book, I too
    also found the latest release appears to have dropped the number of
    hits,(Spam) my point is that my web site that used the guest book increased
    in ranking? so the smammers might be doing me a favour, maybe you should
    install a guest book (without the latest release of course), sounds like
    water spider has some good advice painfull as it sounds, (was tempted to ask
    what he though of one of my sites but decided my ego could not stand it).

    Mike C

    "Micah Klesick" <Micah@creationtidbits.com> wrote in message
    news:ev699j$i577@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com.. .
    >I have to agree with you. I do not have a agreement, but I do have
    >everything I have ever talked to him about in a email folder and I can go
    >back to about 3 emails that say that I am making no guarantees to search
    >engine placement. He has paid me for the past work, I did it for $15 an
    >hour since it was only my 6th website, Not sure what he would gain by
    >getting any refund anyway, a couple bucks?
    >
    > Micah
    >
    > Nancy O wrote:
    >> And his Google Keyword Ad budget per month is how much ?????
    >>
    >> He and his friend have been smoking wacky weed in the bee fields if they
    >> think a brand new site can compete with the big boys in less than 1 year.
    >>
    >> This sounds like a ploy to get out of paying you for your time.
    >> Depending
    >> on the terms of your agreement (I hope you have one in writing), I would
    >> pull the site off the server if he doesn't cough up payment.
    >>
    >> --Nancy
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Micah Klesick" <Micah@creationtidbits.com> wrote in message
    >> news:ev65r3$i571@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com.. .
    >>> Hi guys,
    >>> just wondering your opinion on website I just created for a client.
    >>> http://www.cedarglenbees.com
    >>> He really likes it, but he is not happy because it is not top on Google.
    >>> The site has been up for about 2 months, not enough time to hardly get
    >>> on google, let alone top. He says he had a friend check it for him to
    >>> see what was wrong and way his site is not in Google. Here is what his
    >>> friend said: "He claims the problem is in the addressing and I will not
    >>> show up until this is corrected. He says there are some errors that
    >>> prevent it from happening. Could you check this out and fix it for me?".
    >>> I do not think the guy knows what he is talking about, as it is included
    >>> in Google, just pretty low, but what is to expect for a 2 month old
    >>> site?
    >>> Here is what my client wants: "If this is fact you owe me a discount
    >>> this lack of exposure may be costing us sales." I am going to email him
    >>> and say 'Whatever', but thought I would get your thoughts first.
    >>> I have submitted XML sitemaps, submitted to Google, MSN, and some
    >>> others.
    >>> Micah
    >>>
    >>> http://www.learnNOF.creationtidbits.com
    >>> tutorials on NOF

    >>



  9. #29
    Waterspider
    Guest

    Default Re: what do I say?


    "Mike C" <mike_cummings@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:evb5j0$5t76@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com.. .
    > Micah I noticed you have been involved in checking out the guest book, I
    > too also found the latest release appears to have dropped the number of
    > hits,(Spam) my point is that my web site that used the guest book
    > increased in ranking? so the smammers might be doing me a favour, maybe
    > you should install a guest book (without the latest release of course),
    > sounds like water spider has some good advice painfull as it sounds, (was
    > tempted to ask what he though of one of my sites but decided my ego could
    > not stand it).
    >

    Aw, c'mon Mike... I'll be gentle <g>

    Waterspider

    p.s. And that would be "she," not "he."



  10. #30
    Waterspider
    Guest

    Default Re: Waterspider Web Design Tips


    "Linda Gerfen" <desertlane@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:eva4e1$1on1@flsun90netnews01.netobjects.com.. .
    >
    >
    > With regards to layout, this study is quite interesting and helpful:
    > http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/main.htm
    >

    Excellent article, Linda; thanks for the link. I was surprised at a few
    things, i.e. smaller print is likely to be read rather than scanned. Still,
    it's comforting to know that oldschool, first-year journalism theory applies
    to web design.

    Waterspider



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